canadiansonganon:

Astronomy Picture of the Day: January 21st, 2003

In the vast Orion Molecular Cloud complex, several bright blue nebulas are particularly apparent. Pictured above are two of the most prominent reflection nebulas - dust clouds lit by the reflecting light of bright embedded stars. The more famous nebula is M78, on the upper right, cataloged over 200 years ago. On the lower left is the lesser known NGC 2071. Astronomers continue to study these reflection nebulas to better understand how interior stars form. The Orion complex lies about 1500 light-years distant, contains the Orion and Horsehead nebulas, and covers much of the constellation of Orion.

Credit: Daniel Verschatse (Antilhue Obs.)

canadiansonganon:

Astronomy Picture of the Day: January 21st, 2003

In the vast Orion Molecular Cloud complex, several bright blue nebulas are particularly apparent. Pictured above are two of the most prominent reflection nebulas - dust clouds lit by the reflecting light of bright embedded stars. The more famous nebula is M78, on the upper right, cataloged over 200 years ago. On the lower left is the lesser known NGC 2071. Astronomers continue to study these reflection nebulas to better understand how interior stars form. The Orion complex lies about 1500 light-years distant, contains the Orion and Horsehead nebulas, and covers much of the constellation of Orion.

Credit: Daniel Verschatse (Antilhue Obs.)

wnycradiolab:

rhamphotheca:

The Nautilus Live crew encounters a Flapjack Octopus (Opisthoteuthis sp., most likely O. agassizii) with the ROV currently exploring the deep sea Anegada Passage in the Caribbean Sea.

*Although the species is identified as a “Dumbo Octopus” in the video, I decided to make a more specific identification for you ;)

(via: http://www.nautiluslive.org)

Look at this little dude! (Or dudette! Or however octopi handle gender!)

veinesnoires:

Carina Nebula
Rosette Nebula
Heart Nebula
Fairy Pillar Nebula
Orion Nebula
Eagle Nebula
Flame Vista Nebula
Crab Nebula

canadiansonganon:

The Falcon 9 rocket streaks into a starry sky over Cape Canaveral

SpaceX launched a Dragon supply ship packed with mice, an experimental 3D printer, a hurricane research instrument, and a bundle of crew provisions on a two-day pursuit of the International Space Station with a thunderous middle-of-the-night sendoff from Cape Canaveral on Sunday aboard a Falcon 9 rocket booster.

Credit: SpaceX, Spaceflight Now, Stephen Clark

canadiansonganon:

The Falcon 9 rocket streaks into a starry sky over Cape Canaveral

SpaceX launched a Dragon supply ship packed with mice, an experimental 3D printer, a hurricane research instrument, and a bundle of crew provisions on a two-day pursuit of the International Space Station with a thunderous middle-of-the-night sendoff from Cape Canaveral on Sunday aboard a Falcon 9 rocket booster.

Credit: SpaceXSpaceflight NowStephen Clark

jedavu:

Amazing designs from Romain Trystram

brookhavenlab:

This metallic maze once squeezed protons into tight beams inside our Cosmotron, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world during the 1950s. Wanna know more about our first accelerator and the discoveries it made possible? We’ve got you covered.

brookhavenlab:

This metallic maze once squeezed protons into tight beams inside our Cosmotron, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world during the 1950s. 

Wanna know more about our first accelerator and the discoveries it made possible? We’ve got you covered.

fairy-wren:

(via Long Tailed Tit by Menno Schaefer / 500px)
canadiansonganon:

Astronomy Picture of the Day: January 28th, 2002

What would it be like to stand on the surface of another world, to look all around you, and to try to figure out how this world got there? To get an idea, scroll right. In 1972 during the Apollo 17 mission, astronauts Harrison Schmitt and Eugene Cernan found out first hand. In this case, the world was Earth’s own Moon. In one of the more famous panoramas taken on the Moon, the magnificent desolation of the barren Moon is apparent. Visible are rocks, hills, craters, the lunar rover, and astronaut Schmitt preparing to take a soil sample. A few days after this image was taken, humanity left the Moon and has yet to return. An interactive version of the above image can be found here.

Credit: Apollo 17 Crew, NASA

canadiansonganon:

Astronomy Picture of the Day: January 28th, 2002

What would it be like to stand on the surface of another world, to look all around you, and to try to figure out how this world got there? To get an idea, scroll right. In 1972 during the Apollo 17 mission, astronauts Harrison Schmitt and Eugene Cernan found out first hand. In this case, the world was Earth’s own Moon. In one of the more famous panoramas taken on the Moon, the magnificent desolation of the barren Moon is apparent. Visible are rocks, hills, craters, the lunar rover, and astronaut Schmitt preparing to take a soil sample. A few days after this image was taken, humanity left the Moon and has yet to return. An interactive version of the above image can be found here.

Credit: Apollo 17 Crew, NASA