canadiansonganon:

► Apollo 4 was the first unmanned test of the Saturn V launch vehicle for Project Apollo. It was an “all up” test, all three stages S-IC, S-II, and S-IVB, were tested in the same flight. The mission was also known as SA-501, Apollo-Saturn 501, or AS-501. The J-2 engine of the S-IVB 3rd stage was shut down after the stage entered orbit, then restarted in flight to simulate trans-lunar injection. A Block I Command and Service Module (CSM) was carried, and the Command Module was accelerated to high speed to simulate re-entry from a lunar mission, and recovered.

NASA’s Apollo 4 Mission, Saturn V Test: Part 2 (1968)

canadiansonganon:

► Apollo 4 was the first unmanned test of the Saturn V launch vehicle for Project Apollo. It was an “all up” test, all three stages S-IC, S-II, and S-IVB, were tested in the same flight. The mission was also known as SA-501, Apollo-Saturn 501, or AS-501. The J-2 engine of the S-IVB 3rd stage was shut down after the stage entered orbit, then restarted in flight to simulate trans-lunar injection. A Block I Command and Service Module (CSM) was carried, and the Command Module was accelerated to high speed to simulate re-entry from a lunar mission, and recovered.

NASA’s Apollo 4 Mission, Saturn V Test: Part 1 (1968)

canadiansonganon:

► Astronomy is the oldest of the sciences. Since the dawn of history, the sun by day and the myriad stars by night have never ceased to fill man with wonderment and awe. Space is populated by millions upon millions of stars, each like our own sun but incomparably more distant. They are associated into huge groups, often visible as spectacular clusters and nebulae, each a separate star system like the Milky Way to which we belong.

We know these things because astronomers, with their powerful telescopes, can actually see and photograph the light waves from far distant stars. But the discovery that radio waves were also reaching us from outer space has led to the building of completely new kinds of telescopes: radio telescopes to track down where these radio signals are coming from and what they mean. And so began the science of radio astronomy, using radio waves instead of light waves.

Radio Astronomy in Australia (1958)

canadiansonganon:

for-all-mankind:

placeofpluto:

#WakeUpRosetta — Once upon a time… (by ESA)

This is so cute!

It’s almost time, folks! This really cute video made by the European Space Agency highlights a little bit of the groundbreaking Rosetta mission, which after a two and a half year coast through the solar system is about to reach its prime target: the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. It will be the first spacecraft to both orbit and land on a comet, deploying the small lander Philae on its surface.

You can follow the Rosetta mission here.

Continued here. These videos are fifteen kinds of adorable.

reblogging this for the continuation mentioned above. check it out!

Scissor Sisters - Might Tell You Tonight
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spaceplasma:

Quick Rosetta update:

This is the shape model of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. From the images taken on 14 July, the OSIRIS team has begun modelling the comet’s three-dimensional shape. The animated gif presented here covers one full rotation of the nucleus around its spin axis, to emphasise the lobate structure of the comet. This model will be refined as more data becomes available – it is still a preliminary shape model and some features may be artefacts.

More information: here
Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

spaceplasma:

Quick Rosetta update:

This is the shape model of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. From the images taken on 14 July, the OSIRIS team has begun modelling the comet’s three-dimensional shape. The animated gif presented here covers one full rotation of the nucleus around its spin axis, to emphasise the lobate structure of the comet. This model will be refined as more data becomes available – it is still a preliminary shape model and some features may be artefacts.

  • More information: here

Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

for-all-mankind:

Of the hundreds of times I have seen the Saturn V rocket, at all the locations it is on display in the world, never has it ever been as beautiful or commanding as it was this time.

The five J-2 engines on the second stage attracted my eye the most. The countless wires, chambers, and fuel pumps of the engines contrasted with lack of aerodynamic protection gave the business end of the S-II a mechanical sense that I have never really appreciated before. Sure, the five F-1 engines on the S-IC or the single J-2 on the S-IVB are equally as complex and exposed, but for some reason, the cluster of them on the second stage is appealing.

A surprising lack of people in the building gave me great opportunities for pictures I normally avoid taking due to crowds, and I was able to see the rocket in a totally different perspective.

:Vall

OMG

watching gf with my gf

spacewatching:

NASA’s Orion spacecraft crew module has been stacked on the service module inside the Operations and Checkout Building at Kennedy Space Center — renamed on July 21, 2014 as the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building in honor of the legendary astronaut and first man to set foot on the moon, Neil Armstrong.
The Operations and Checkout Building was built in 1964. The facility has played a vital role in NASA’s spaceflight history. The high bay was used during the Apollo program to process and test the command, service and lunar modules. The facility is being used today to process and assemble NASA’s Orion spacecraft as the agency prepares to embark on the next giant leap in space exploration, sending astronauts to an asteroid and Mars.

apart from everything else i really like the aesthetic of the tiles in the foreground.

spacewatching:

NASA’s Orion spacecraft crew module has been stacked on the service module inside the Operations and Checkout Building at Kennedy Space Center — renamed on July 21, 2014 as the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building in honor of the legendary astronaut and first man to set foot on the moon, Neil Armstrong.

The Operations and Checkout Building was built in 1964. The facility has played a vital role in NASA’s spaceflight history. The high bay was used during the Apollo program to process and test the command, service and lunar modules. The facility is being used today to process and assemble NASA’s Orion spacecraft as the agency prepares to embark on the next giant leap in space exploration, sending astronauts to an asteroid and Mars.

apart from everything else i really like the aesthetic of the tiles in the foreground.